vale Marcus Loane

Being an historian by training, you get to realise that we are only where we are because of who and what has gone on before us. During my time at Theological College and beyond, the stories of the leadership of former Archbishop of Sydney Sir Marcus Loane left an impression on me.

He passed away last week. There is a great rememberance and reflection piece on him by Philip Jensen here. Here’s a sample:

Sir Marcus’ ninety-seven crowded years can be summarised: as child of God, husband, father of four, grandfather of seventeen, great grandfather of twenty-three, minister of the gospel, pastor, army chaplain, scholar, lecturer, college principal, archbishop, primate, historian, theologian, author, and preacher. He preached in every parish of our diocese and every diocese of our nation. He was a great ambassador for Christ often representing our diocese around the world. But apart from telling of a full and active life in the service of other people, such a summary does not really remind us of the man.

He was, for most of his working life, quite simply the leader of Sydney Anglicans. A Christian of deep Protestant and Evangelical convictions, he stood for all that Sydney Anglicans hold dear. He was a man in Christ. Reverently, carefully and faithfully committed to the exposition of the Scriptures. He loved the sovereign ways of God’s action in the salvation of people – especially in the Reformation of the 16th century, the Evangelical Awakening of the 18th century and in the history of Australia. In his own tumultuous times, he stood firmly for the evangelisation of the city and nation, while being deeply involved in the promotion of world mission. Consistent with the tradition of evangelicals, he carried a deep social conscience for the poor, the addicted and the marginalised of our society, the “widows and orphans” of our day.

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